OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

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OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Tri-StateYouthSports » Fri Oct 18, 2019 2:16 pm

OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues (all sports) as reported in the Board of Directors meeting minutes.

Next OHSAA Board of Directors Meeting -- Jan. 16, 2020

October 24
The Board reviewed the list of recent infractions by OHSAA member schools. Since the Board’s last meeting, 27 schools were penalized for violations of OHSAA bylaws or sports regulations. The Board was provided with a list of schools that have violated OHSAA bylaws or sports regulations since the last Board of Directors Meeting on September 19. 
  • In an update from last month’s listing when the incorrect sport was reported, West Jefferson High School had two student‐athletes in varsity boys soccer violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible students participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the two contests were scrimmages and scrimmages do not carry any “won‐lost” statistics.
  • Columbus West High School had a student‐athlete in varsity football violate Bylaw 4‐3‐3, Semesters. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • The Plains Athens High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4‐8‐1, International & Exchange Students. However, the student met Exception 1 to Bylaw 4‐8‐1 (move into district with parents) but the school permitted the student to participate in interscholastic athletics prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Gates Mills Hawken High School had a student-athlete in girls varsity tennis violate Bylaw 4‐7‐2, Transfer. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Ashtabula Lakeside High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity soccer violate General Sports Regulation 14.1, Ejection for Unsporting Conduct, when he failed to complete the second game suspension requirement as a result of being ejected from a game earlier in the season. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the two victorious contests in which the ineligible student participated before completing his suspension.
  • Kenton Middle School had eight student‐athletes in 7th grade volleyball violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non‐Interscholastic Programs – Team Sports, when the student‐athletes participated in a non‐school sanctioned contest while members of the school team. In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the students ineligible for the
    reminder of the school season.
  • Amanda‐Clearcreek High School violated Bylaws 6‐1‐2 and Bylaw 6‐1‐3, Requirements for Coaching, when an individual(s) who was not board approved took over coaching duties for a boys varsity soccer game. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the non‐certified coach participated.
  • Centerville High School had a student‐athlete violate Bylaw 4‐7‐2, Transfer. However, the student met Exception 1 to Bylaw 4‐7‐2 (move into district with parents) but the school permitted the student to participate in interscholastic athletics past the 50% mark of the season before receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Cincinnati Mount Healthy High School had a junior varsity football coach violate General Sports Regulation 14.2, Ejection for Unsporting Conduct, when he failed to complete the one game suspension requirement as a result of being ejected from a game earlier in the season. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the coach participated before completing his suspension.
  • Strongsville High School violated Cross Country Sport Regulation 1.1 when permitting an ineligible student‐athlete to compete in a girls varsity cross country contest. CC SR 1.1 requires 10 days of practice under the supervision of the cross country coaching staff prior to any participation in contests. It was discovered the student-athlete won the competition on September 21, with the team finishing fifth. The student-athlete thus forfeits her first place finish and Strongsville will also forfeit this meet to schools that finished below fifth place.
  • Avon High School permitted a girls varsity golf player to participate without receiving an eligibility ruling under Bylaw 4‐8‐1,
    International and Exchange Students, Exception 2. Based on the information provided, the student would have been ruled eligible under Bylaw 4‐8‐1, Exception 2. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and no forfeitures were required but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Pataskala Licking Heights Central Middle School permitted an ineligible student‐athlete under Bylaw 4‐3‐1, Enrollment and Attendance, to participate in one middle school volleyball contest. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Licking Heights forfeited the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Toledo Woodward High School had a student‐athlete who was reassigned by the district as a result of a specific change of academic program and was eligible to qualify for full eligibility under Bylaw 4‐7‐6, Intradistrict Transfer. However, the district failed to submit the request for eligibility to the Executive Director’s Office within the first 15 school days of the school year, as stipulated in the Bylaw. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Franklin Bishop Fenwick High School had a boys sub‐varsity basketball coach violate Bylaw 4‐9‐4 #1, Recruiting, when he contacted a student via social media to influence his enrollment at the school. The Executive Director’s Office agreed with the school’s self‐imposed penalty of removing the coach from the program. Additionally, in accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, Bishop Fenwick High School has been publicly reprimanded and the coach is ineligible for the 2020‐2021 OHSAA tournament at any other school at which he may be hired this season.
  • Brooklyn Middle School had a student‐athlete in 7th grade volleyball violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non‐Interscholastic Programs‐Team Sports, when the student‐athlete participated in several non‐school contests while a member of the school team. In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office agreed with the school’s self‐imposed penalty of removing the student from the team. Furthermore, in accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the four victorious contests in which the student participated after the infraction occurred but before the penalty was assessed.
  • Hamilton High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4‐2‐1, Age. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the contests were scrimmages and scrimmages do not carry any “won‐loss” statistics.
  • Oregon Clay High School had a student‐athlete in boys junior varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the two victorious contests in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Cleveland St. Joseph Academy had a student‐athlete in girls varsity soccer violate Sports Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non‐Interscholastic Programs‐Team Sports, when the student‐athlete participated in a non‐school contest while a member of the school team. In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the school’s next two regular season contests.
  • Pataskala Watkins Memorial High School had a student‐athlete in girls varsity soccer violate General Sport Regulation 7.2.1, Participating in Non‐Interscholastic Programs, when the student‐athlete participated in a non‐school sanctioned contest while a member of the school team. In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the student ineligible for the next two contests. Furthermore, in accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the two victorious contests in which the student participated after the infraction occurred but before the penalty was assessed.
  • Haviland Wayne Trace High School had a student‐athlete in girls varsity golf violate Bylaw 4‐8‐1, International & Exchange Students. However, the student met Exception 2 to Bylaw 4‐8‐1 (foreign exchange student) but the school permitted the student to participate in interscholastic athletics prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Parma Normandy High School had a student‐athlete in junior varsity football violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with
    Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the two contests in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Dayton Oakwood High School had a student‐athlete in girls varsity cross country violate Cross Country Sport Regulation 1.1, Interscholastic Participation (Acclimatization Days). In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐5, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated. All eligible student‐athletes may keep their points, places and any awards earned, but the meet(s) shall be forfeited.
  • Farmersville Valley View Middle School had a student‐athlete in 8th grade football violate Bylaw 4‐3‐4, Semesters. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Oberlin High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4‐7‐3, Mid Season Transfer. In accordance with
    Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Liberty Center High School had a student‐athlete in freshman football violate Bylaw 4‐7‐2, Transfer. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Chardon Notre Dame‐Cathedral Latin High School had a student‐athlete in junior varsity volleyball violate Bylaw 4‐7‐2, Transfer. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contests in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Chillicothe Unioto High School had a student‐athlete in varsity volleyball violate Bylaw 4‐7‐2, Transfer. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Cleveland John Marshall High School had two student‐athletes who were reassigned by the district as a result of a specific change of academic program and were eligible to qualify for full eligibility under Bylaw 4‐7‐6, Intradistrict Transfer. However, the district failed to submit the request for eligibility to the Executive Director’s Office within the first 15 school days of the school year, as stipulated in the Bylaw. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the students retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
September 19
The Board was provided with a list of schools that have violated OHSAA bylaws or sports regulations since
the last Board of Directors Meeting on August 8.
  • Mansfield Madison Comprehensive High School’s wrestling coach violated Bylaw 6‐1‐4, Requirements for Coaching, when he failed to procure, provide, and maintain proper medical documentation during the 2018‐2019 season. In accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office removed the coach from participation in the 2019‐2020 wrestling tournament and put him on probation for the duration of the 2019‐2020 wrestling season.
  • Mogadore Field High School violated General Sport Regulation 14.1, Ejections for Unsporting Conduct, when a boys’ varsity soccer‐student athlete was ejected from a 2018 contest and only fulfilled half of his mandatory two game suspension before resuming participation during the 2019 soccer season. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐5, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contests in which the ineligible student participated prior to fulfilling the remainder of his suspension. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the contest in which the ineligible student participated. Additionally, the student‐athlete must serve the remainder of his suspension during the school’s next varsity contest.
  • Akron Manchester High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity golf violate Bylaw 4‐3‐1, Enrollment and Attendance. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐5, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Findlay High School had a student‐athlete violate Bylaw 4‐6‐3, Residency, and two student‐athletes violate Bylaw 4‐8‐1, International & Exchange Students. However, the students met Exception 1 to Bylaw 4‐6‐3 (change of custody to primary relative) or Exception 1 to Bylaw 4‐8‐1 (move into district with parents), respectively, but the school permitted the students to participate in interscholastic athletics prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the students retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $200 ($100 for each bylaw violation).
  • Chillicothe Southeastern High School had two student‐athletes in varsity football violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible students participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the two contests were scrimmages and scrimmages do not carry any “won‐lost” statistics.
  • West Jefferson High School had two student‐athletes in varsity football violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible students participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the two contests were scrimmages and scrimmages do not carry any “won‐lost” statistics.
  • Toronto High School had a student‐athlete in junior varsity football violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated. However, no forfeitures were required since the contest was a scrimmage and scrimmages do not carry any “won‐lost” statistics.
  • Reading High School a student‐athlete in girls junior varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the one victorious contest in which the ineligible student participated.
    Campbell Memorial High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity soccer violate Bylaw 4‐3‐1, Enrollment and Attendance. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐5, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the two victorious contests in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Massillon Washington High School violated Bylaw 3‐5‐1, Student Participation and Physical Examination Forms, when it allowed a student‐athlete to participate in an interscholatic volleyball contest(s) without an updated Preparticipation Physical Exam. In accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the school was formally reprimanded and the student was removed from competition until she had obtained a valid PPE.

August 8
The Board was provided with a list of schools that have violated OHSAA bylaws or sports regulations since the last Board of Directors Meeting on June 3.
  • Beaver Eastern High School had multiple coaches violate General Sport Regulation 4, Failure to Acquire Pupil Activity Permits. In accordance with General Sport Regulation 4, Eastern has been fined $750.
  • Louisville St. Thomas Aquinas High School and Middle School violated Bylaw 4‐9‐3 #2, Recruiting‐ Mass Mailing, when mailed promotional advertisements were sent to named individuals with school age children that were not enrolled in their schools. In accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office has fined St. Thomas Aquinas High School $150.
  • Youngstown Ursuline High School violated General Sport Regulation 7.3, Permitting Students to Participate on Non‐School Teams Outside of the School Team’s Season, when four boys basketball players participated in a non‐interscholastic event together, thus violating the 50% limitation. In accordance with Bylaw 11, the students were suspended for the first two scrimmages of the 2019‐2020 basketball season.
  • Coshocton High School’s varsity football coaches violated General Sport Regulation 8.3.1, Individual Instruction After the Season, when several coaches provided instruction to more than 7 players during the month of May. The Executive Director’s Office agreed with the school’s self‐imposed penalty of reducing the number of coaching days in the summer of 2019 by two days for the football coaching staff.
  • Toledo Bowsher High School had a student‐athlete in varsity football violate Bylaw 4‐7‐2, Transfer, during the 2018 season. However, the student met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (bona fide legal change of residence) but the school permitted the student to participate during the second half of the season prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and no forfeitures were required but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Cleveland Martin Luther King Jr. High School had a student athlete in girls varsity track and field violate Bylaw 4‐2‐1, Age. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐5, Forfeitures, theBoard of Directors Minutes (8/8/19) — 4 school must forfeit the five contests in which the student participated and in which the school was victorious. However, all eligible athletes may keep their points, records, awards and any qualifying positions earned from the contests in question.

June 3
The Board was provided with a list of schools that have violated OHSAA bylaws or sports regulations since the last regularly‐scheduled Board of Directors Meeting on April 11. A total of 139 schools violated numerous sport regulations during the 2018‐19 winter sports season. These violations resulted in $7,630 in fines. There were 191 violations of General Sports Regulation 3, Mandatory Requirement for Rating/Voting for Tournament
Officials (several schools violated this regulation in numerous sports); one (1) school violated General Sports Regulation 5, Penalties for Failure to Conduct Pre‐Season Meetings; and 61 schools violated General Sports Regulation 6, OHSAA Sponsored Tournaments Entry/Withdraw Procedures and Draw/Seed Meeting Dates.
  • Louisville St. Thomas Aquinas High School violated Bylaw 7‐1‐8, Contracts for Athletic Contests, when it cancelled a contract with another member school without consent for a week three 2018 football contest. Due to failed attempts to resolve the contract dispute, the resolution of the contract was referred to the Executive Director’s Office for a binding resolution. The Executive Director’s Office determined that St. Thomas Aquinas shall compensate the other member school in the amount of $7,500.
  • Leetonia High School had a student‐athlete in varsity baseball violate Bylaw 4‐3‐1, Enrollment and Attendance. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any contests in which the student participated and in which the school was victorious. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the contest in which the ineligible student participated.
  • Cincinnati Withrow High School had a student‐athlete who was reassigned by the district as a result of a specific change of academic program and was eligible to qualify for full eligibility under Bylaw 4‐7‐6, Intradistrict Transfer. However, the district failed to submit the request for eligibility to the Executive Director’s Office within the first 15 school days of the school year, as stipulated in the Bylaw. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐ 1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Westerville South High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity track & field violate Bylaw 4‐6‐3, Residency. However, the student met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (change of custody to primary relative) but the school permitted the student to participate during the 2018 track & field season prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and no forfeitures were required but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Dayton Miami Valley School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity tennis violate Bylaw 4‐8‐1, International & Exchange Students. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any contests in which the student participated and in which the school was victorious. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the contest in which the ineligible student participated. Furthermore, all eligible athletes may keep their points, records, awards and any qualifying positions earned from the contest in question.
  • Springfield Northwestern High School had a student‐athlete in varsity baseball violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the one contest in which the student participated and in which the school was victorious. 9.
  • Lyndhurst Brush High School had a student‐athlete in boys varsity tennis violate Bylaw 4‐7‐2, Transfer. However, the student met Exception 2 to the Bylaw (change of custody) but the school permitted the student to participate prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Byawl 4‐4‐1,
    Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Sugarcreek Garaway High School violated Bylaw 4‐9‐3 #2, Recruiting‐ Mass Mailing, when it utilized a marketing firm to mail promotional advertisements for its Virtual Academy and the flyers were sent to named individuals with school age children. In light of the corrective measures the school has taken and in accordance with Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office has fined the school $100.
  • Ashland High School’s varsity softball team violated General Sports Regulation 20, Regular Season Participation Limitation/Season Start Date, when it participated in a contest prior to the start of the sports season. The Executive Director’s Office administered the penalty outlined in the Sport Regulation and removed the team from the OHSAA sponsored postseason tournament.
  • Toledo Notre Dame Academy had a student‐athlete in girls junior varsity cross country violate Bylaw 4‐8‐1, International & Exchange Students. However, the student met Exception 1 to the Bylaw (parent’s move to Ohio) but the school permitted the student to participate in five contests prior to receiving an eligibility ruling from the Executive Director’s Office. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school was required to submit a preventive action plan and has been reprimanded.
  • Cleveland James Ford Rhodes High School had a student‐athlete who was reassigned by the district as a result of a specific change of academic program and was eligible to qualify for full eligibility under Bylaw 4‐7‐6, Intradistrict Transfer. However, the district failed to submit the request for eligibility to the Executive Director’s Office within the first 15 school days of the school year, as stipulated in the Bylaw. The OHSAA has restored eligibility for the student retroactively and prospectively but, in accordance with Bylaw 4‐1‐1, Administrative Error, the school has been fined $100.
  • Milford High School had a student‐athlete in junior varsity football and junior varsity baseball violate Bylaw 4‐3‐1, Enrollment and Attendance. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the contests in which the student participated and inBoard of Directors Minutes (6/3/19) — 4 which the school was victorious. Furthermore, the school was also required to submit an action plan addressing measures to prevent this type of error moving forward.
  • Dayton Stivers School for the Arts had a student‐athlete in boys varsity track & field violate Bylaw 4‐4‐1, Scholarship. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the three contests in which the student participated and in which the school was victorious. However, all eligible athletes are permitted to keep their points, records, awards and any qualifying positions earned from the meets in question.
  • Goshen High School had five student‐athletes in boys basketball violate Sports Regulation 7.3, Regulation Permitting Students to Participate on Non‐School Teams Outside of the School Team’s Season, when they participated in a non‐interscholatic event together in excess of the permissible 50% limitation. In accordance with the Sports Regulation and Bylaw 11, Penalties, the Executive Director’s Office declared the students ineligible for the school’s first two scrimmages of the 2019‐20 season.
  • Akron Kenmore‐Garfield High School had a student‐athlete violate Bylaw 1‐6‐3, Team Membership, when the student, a transgender female, participated on the girls track & field team without authorization in accordance with the OHSAA transgender policy. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit the contest in which the student participated and in which the school was victorious. However, all eligible athletes may keep their points, records, awards and any qualifying positions earned from the meet in question.
  • Hubbard High School’s varsity baseball team violated Bylaw 9‐2‐1, Contests With Out of State Schools, when it missed school time to travel to participate in contests with schools located outside of the contiguous boundaries to the state of Ohio. The Executive Director’s Office
    administered the penalty outlined in the Bylaw and removed the team from the OHSAA sponsored postseason tournament.
  • Hartville Lake Center Chris‐tian School had a student‐athlete in girls varsity track and field violate Bylaw 4‐2‐2 and Bylaw 4‐2‐3, Age. In accordance with Bylaw 10‐2‐1, Forfeitures, the school must forfeit any contests in which the student participated and in which the school was victorious. However, no forfeitures were required since the school did not win the ten contests in which the ineligible student participated. Furthermore, all eligible athletes are permitted to keep their points, records, awards and any qualifying positions earned from the meets in question.
Last edited by Tri-StateYouthSports on Mon Nov 25, 2019 7:23 am, edited 4 times in total.



mattash
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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by mattash » Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:31 pm

Pupil activity permits ?

Beaver Eastern High School had multiple coaches violate General Sport Regulation 4, Failure to Acquire Pupil Activity Permits. In accordance with General Sport Regulation 4, Eastern has been fined $750.



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Point blank » Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:43 pm

Every person that is around your kids are suppose to have a pupil activity permit. Which is a back ground check, fundamentals of coaching and to apply to state for Pupil activity permit



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Point blank » Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:44 pm

That's why no one is suppose to have alumni involved in practices or team events such as open fields or open gyms.



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by mattash » Fri Oct 18, 2019 10:19 pm

That seems a little crazy. Is that a lifetime thing ? What about old coaches that come in for speeches? 750 seeks a bit much.



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Pol pot » Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:17 pm

mattash wrote:
Fri Oct 18, 2019 10:19 pm
That seems a little crazy. Is that a lifetime thing ? What about old coaches that come in for speeches? 750 seeks a bit much.
This is also a State Legislature issue, it’s part of the OHIO Revised Code and NOT an OHSAA rule.



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by mattash » Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:19 pm

Who collects the money ?



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Pol pot » Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:59 am

mattash wrote:
Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:19 pm
Who collects the money ?
What money? Activity Fees or Fines?



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by mattash » Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:01 am

Sorry. Fines. Like the Eastern example



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Pol pot » Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:11 am

mattash wrote:
Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:01 am
Sorry. Fines. Like the Eastern example
To the OHSAA budget to help with compliance. As with any organization or group there must be consequences for not following rules, rules and fines that are established by the member schools to legislate fair practices and not take away from the kids. In Easterns case, the fines are significant, however the violations were pretty severe. The Activity Permits are mandated by State Law and ODE. If a coach or volunteer does not have the proper credentials and something would happen the civil and criminal penalties would be very severe. Other fines like failure to vote or seed teams are less $$ but designed to insure the process is being followed, and fines for coach ejections are to encourage proper behavior.



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Poo Bear » Mon Oct 21, 2019 9:46 am

Wheelersburg plays rough and holds. They need fined also



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by 4thgoal » Mon Oct 21, 2019 3:28 pm

Poo Bear wrote:
Mon Oct 21, 2019 9:46 am
Wheelersburg plays rough and holds. They need fined also
:lol: :lol: :lol:



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by CheeseBurger » Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:40 am

The Vinton County at Nelsonville film has been sent to state for review. No one knows the crew because they failed to produce grade cards as to remain anonymous. It didn’t take long to hear they were the same Portsmouth crew that has had their issues very similar ones in past contests.
Please contact the state with any complaints or issues with this crew. I understand mistakes are made but several stories are floating around that need to be validated. Thank god for the 95% that are straight honest men that would rather quit than cheat.



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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Pol pot » Sat Nov 02, 2019 5:53 am

CheeseBurger wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 4:40 am
The Vinton County at Nelsonville film has been sent to state for review. No one knows the crew because they failed to produce grade cards as to remain anonymous. It didn’t take long to hear they were the same Portsmouth crew that has had their issues very similar ones in past contests.
Please contact the state with any complaints or issues with this crew. I understand mistakes are made but several stories are floating around that need to be validated. Thank god for the 95% that are straight honest men that would rather quit than cheat.
I highly doubt they did not bring a lineup card to remain anonymous, as the contracts are computerized and has each persons name and license # on the contract as well as position.



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Tri-StateYouthSports
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Re: OHSAA Infractions, Appeals and Legal Issues

Post by Tri-StateYouthSports » Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:32 pm

Updated the original post to include infractions from the October 24th OHSAA Board Meeting.



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